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Click here to read about a woman who received a bionic eye, allowing her to see for the first time in 15 years!

This is a very good summary of astigmatism, a common (and commonly misunderstood) visual problem:

http://www.allaboutvision.com/conditions/astigmatism.htm

TotalVision's Office Administrator, Sharon, wrote a great post to answer all your insurance questions. Click here to check it out!

What a great program! http://www.cbsnews.com/news/k-9-german-sherpard-helps-blind-athlete-run-marathons/

September is Sports and Eye Home Safety Month. Here are some good eye protection tips: http://www.geteyesmart.org/eyesmart/living/eye-injuries/sports.cfm

It’s Contact Lens Health Week. Healthy habits=healthy eyes. #OnePairTakeCare

It's hard to believe, but it's almost time to head back to school! Most classroom learning is visual, so make sure to schedule your child's eye exam soon! http://www.allaboutvision.com/eye-exam/children.htm

July is UV Safety Month. Don't forget to protect your eyes from the sun! http://www.adventuresbydaddy.com/2013/09/19/sunglasses-uv-protection-important-seasons/

This is the sweetest video! http://www.cnn.com/videos/us/2015/07/13/toddler-gets-glasses-moos-pkg-ebof.cnn/video/playlists/wacky-world-of-jeanne-moos/



You feel fire in your eyes, a massive burn. You can’t keep your hands to yourself; all you want to do is itch. Your contacts or glasses can’t help you because your vision is blurred. The glare from the sun is painful; and you ask yourself, “What could this be?” The answer is Dry Eye Syndrome (DES), and it is a disease. DES can be because your eyes stop producing enough tears (composed of oil, water, and mucus) to lubricate and nourish the front surface of your eyes or the tears evaporate too quickly. Certain autoimmune conditions, medications, and hormones can compromise the tear film. DES also occurs with advancing age, and is much more common in women than men. Environment, long term use of contact lenses, and LASIK can cause decreased tear production and dry eye.
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Spring is in the air! ...And so are pollen, ragweed, and a plethora of seasonal allergens. Several cities in Connecticut were listed on the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America's top 100 list for "The Most Challenging Places to Live with Spring Allergies" for 2014.

What constitutes eye allergies? And what can be done about it?
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After a bitter and seemingly endless winter, spring has finally sprung in New England! In honor of sunny days to come, I've decided to put together some things to take into consideration when selecting sunglasses. And, more expensive does not necessarily mean better! Read on for some tips to make your time in the sun safer and more comfortable (and look like a rock star, while you're at it):
1. UV Protection:

There are three types of UV light -- UVA, UVB, and UVC. UVA radiation, albeit less damaging than UVB, is the most prevalent and can contribute to early aging (wrinkles, cataract development). UVB light is the most intense form of UV light and is responsible for sunburns. Both UVA and UVB light likely contribute to cataract development, macular degeneration, and cancers of the sensitive skin along the eyelid. UVC radiation is blocked by the atmosphere and does not reach earth.

There are three types of UV light -- UVA, UVB, and UVC. UVA radiation, albeit less damaging than UVB, is the most prevalent and can contribute to early aging (wrinkles, cataract development). UVB light is the most intense form of UV light and is responsible for sunburns. Both UVA and UVB light likely contribute to cataract de...

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One of the most common questions I get during a routine eye exam is, "What foods or supplements are best for my eyes?" While there are numerous "eye vitamins" available, and greater levels of certain nutrients may be indicated with certain eye conditions, a balanced diet is a good way to start for anyone. The following is a list of beneficial nutrients and some foods in which they are found:

Beta-carotene: found in carrots, sweet potatos, spinach, kale, butternut squash
Omega-3 Fatty Acids: found in cold-water fish such as salmon, mackerel and herring; freshly ground flaxseeds, walnuts, and chia seeds.
Lutein and Zeaxanthin: found in spinach, kale, turnip greens, collard greens, squash.

Bioflavonoids (Flavonoids): found in tea, red wine, citrus fruits, bilberries, blueberries, cherries, legumes, soy products.

Selenium: found in seafood (shrimp, crab, salmon, halibut), Brazil nuts, enriched noodles, brown rice

Vitamin A: found in beef or chicken liver; eggs, butter, milk.

Vitamin C: found in sweet peppers (red or green), kale, strawberries, broccoli, oranges, cantaloupe.

Vitamin D: found in salmon, sardines, mackerel, milk; orange juice fortified with vitamin D; also produced upon exposure to sunlight

Vitamin E: found in almonds, sunflower seeds, hazelnuts.

Zinc: found in oysters, beef, turkey (dark meat).

A healthy diet can go a long way toward protecting your eyes. If you plan to start taking eye vitamins, you should discuss this with your optometrist or ophthalmologist, as too much of certain supplements may be more harmful than beneficial.

Some information sourced from:
http://www.allaboutvision.com/nutrition/nutrition_summary.htm

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Do your eyes feel tired or dry by the end of the day? Are you prone to achy headaches on your forehead or around your eyes? Does your vision ever seem to go in and out of focus, especially after a long day at work? Do you work all day on a computer?
http://scannerdrome.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/29eye.jpg


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What's new in eyewear trends for 2014? Oversized frames, bright colors, "mathematical" and "cat-eye" shapes, rose-tinted sunwear, extra detailing, vibrant blues and earthy greens.
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What are floaters? And why do eye doctors always ask you if you've seen flashes or floaters recently?
Floaters in and of themselves are harmless, albeit annoying. They are the result of the gradual breakdown of the vitreous (the gel-like substance that makes up most of the inner eye) and are essentially particles of collagen floating in your eye. What you see as moving gray lines or dots are actually shadows cast on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye) due to collagen's interference with light entering the pupil. That is why floaters are more noticeable when looking at a bright sky, white wall, or computer screen: more light enters the eye, thus there is a greater potential for shadows to be cast on the retina by the floating collagen particles.

Floaters in and of themselves are harmless, albeit annoying. They are the result of the gradual breakdown of the vitreous (the gel-like substance that makes up most of the inner eye) and are essentially particles of collagen floating in your eye. What you see as moving gray lines or dots are actually shadows cast on the retina (the light-sensitive tissue that lines the back of the eye) due to collagen's interference with light entering the pupil. That is why floaters are more noticeable when looking at a bright sky, white wall, or computer screen: more light enters the eye, thus there is a greater potential for shadows to be cast on t...

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Do you know that everybody has a natural blind spot in each eye; that is, a spot in one's peripheral vision where nothing can be seen?
Cover your left eye. Find a spot directly in front of you (a thumbtack on a wall works well). Extend your right arm straight in front of you, so your thumb covers the spot on the wall. Slowly move your arm outward (away from your nose, to the right), but continue looking forward at your previously marked spot. Pay attention to your moving thumb. Notice that when your thumb reaches a certain point, it disappears! Try it using your left eye and left thumb.
This blind spot exists because your optic nerve (which transmits visual information from the eye to the brain), has no light detecting cells like the rest of the retina does. You don't typically notice your blind spot because the visual fields of each eye overlaps and your brain is able to "fill in" the missing visual information. When we test peripheral vision at TotalVision, we use this blind spot, called the "physiological blind spot," as one means of assessing the accuracy and reliability of our peripheral vision testing.

This blind spot exists because your optic nerve (which transmits visual information from the eye to the brain), has no light detecting cells like the ...

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TotalVision Newington

485 Willard Avenue,

Newington, CT 06111

Phone. 860.666.7053

TotalVision Uncasville

2020 Norwich NL Turnpike,

Uncasville, CT 06382

Phone. 860.848.8777

TotalVision Mystic

12 Coogan Boulevard,

Mystic, CT 06355

Phone. 860.415.9292

Uncasville & Newington Hours:

Monday-Friday 9am-5pm

Saturday 9am-1pm

Late afternoon appointments available upon request.

Mystic Hours:

Tuesday-Friday 9am-5pm

Saturday 9am-1pm

Late afternoon appointments available upon request.